Wednesday, January 15, 2020

How to Prevent Water Damage From Household Fixtures - This Old House


This Old House plumbing and heating expert Richard Trethewey shows ways to detect and stop common plumbing leaks.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Got Water Damage? Hire The Services Of A Professional And Reputed Fire And Water Restoration Company


If you have come in here to read this article, you are probably looking for a fire and water damage restoration company that will do a professional restoration job in your house or commercial property. This article will give you a few tips about picking the right Fire and water restoration company.

  • It is preferable that you only call for fire and water damage restoration companies that have a solid reputation in the field. Stay away from one man teams or freelancers who will promise you a great job only to give you a run around with poor results.
  • Look for a company that will offer 24/7 services. Damage restoration is essentially an emergency service and a company that offers that service should ideally have service availability around the clock.
  • Ask if the company has the latest equipment. Some small companies will often be short-handed when it comes to quality equipment. A professional water damage repair company should ideally have state of the art commercial grade equipment such as dehumidifiers, blowers, truck mounted water extraction units, portable extraction units and other tools such as moisture gauges and humidity meters and emergency generators. If the water damage is significant, a good company will use a lot of equipment to bring about the best results in the fastest way possible. Hiring a small company that will have very limited equipment will mean longer water damage restoration times which will in turn greatly increase the related losses. When it comes to the effectiveness of a water damage repair company, their responsiveness and speed should be of utmost concern to you as it can save you a significant sum of money.
  • Help with the insurance process - Fire and water damage restoration companies are not just important to fix up your house. They, in fact, play a very important role in your damage situation by helping you with the insurance process. Insurance, as you might already know, can be a very daunting process when approached on your own. You might not know how to fill out the forms correctly or you might ask for too little when you file a form. A good fire and water restoration company will appoint an insurance specialist or insurance consultant to your case. This person will then work with the insurance adjustor appointed by the insurance company. With the insurance consultant on your side, you can relax and be assured that a professional is helping you.

Guarantee on the insurance claim - There could be a situation where you might commission water damage restoration work before being approved by the insurance company. It can be a rude shock to receive a check for an amount that does not cover all the expenses of the restoration work. A professional water damage restoration will help you avoid that pickle of a situation by putting out an estimate that will be accepted by the insurance company. Also, they will guarantee their repair estimates in such a way that they will not charge you personally if the insurance company's check does not cover all of the expenses then the fire and water restoration contractor agrees to waive the additional expenses.


Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Gary_E_Smith

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/5771152

Thursday, January 9, 2020

Proper Location of Smoke Alarms


NFPA requires that smoke alarms are located in several locations throughout the home. This video identifies where they should be placed to ensure adequate protection in the event of a home fire.

Monday, January 6, 2020

How to Salvage Your Valuables After Serious Flooding

Saving family keepsakes after a storm can be painstaking, but it's worth it


Heavy rain and severe weather can upend your life. And if you're faced with mucking out your house and tearing out saturated drywall, recovering keepsakes and family treasures might seem like a task for a later day.

But saving your valuables can be a race against the clock—mold can form within 48 hours. To help, the Heritage Emergency National Task Force, cosponsored by FEMA and the Smithsonian Institution, has developed guidelines for how to salvage what you want and dispose of what can’t be saved.

The first step is to determine what type of water you’re dealing with—salty, dirty, or contaminated by sewage or chemicals. If your valuables have come in contact with toxic water during flooding, you might have to call a professional conservator because trying to clean them yourself can be a health risk. If the water was untainted, then take steps to reduce the humidity around your items as you work to clean and dry them. Here’s how from FEMA’s checklist:

Save Your Valuables

Prioritize. You may not be able to save everything after flooding, so focus on what’s most important to you, whether for sentimental or monetary reasons.

"We always hear about dollar-amount damages, but often the losses that affect us the most are the ones to which a dollar amount cannot be assigned," says Lori Foley, administrator of the Heritage Emergency National Task Force. "What do you own that you’d miss terribly if you lost it? Photographs of loved ones in frames, albums, or shoeboxes? Books and paintings passed down through generations? Grandma’s recipe box?"

Air-dry. Gentle air-drying indoors is best. Weather permitting, open your windows to increase indoor airflow. If it’s too hot and humid, use fans, air conditioners, and dehumidifiers. Avoid using hair dryers, irons, ovens, and prolonged exposure to sunlight, which can do irreversible damage.

Handle with care. Delicate items can be especially fragile when wet, so be careful when you handle them. Separate sodden materials by removing photographs from damp albums and taking paintings and prints out of their frames. Place white paper towels between every few pages of wet books.

Clean gently. Loosen dirt and debris on fragile objects carefully with soft cloths and brushes. Avoid rubbing, which can grind in dirt.

Salvage photos. Clean photographs by rinsing them carefully in clean water. Air-dry photos on a plastic screen or paper towel, or by hanging them by the corners with plastic clothespins. Don’t let the image come into contact with other surfaces as it dries.

Cold storage. Damp objects and items that cannot be dealt with immediately should be put in open, unsealed boxes or bags. If you can’t attend to items within 48 hours, you can put photos, papers, books, and textiles in the freezer and clean them later.

"In general, you can freeze many items that cannot be dried out in 48 hours – photos, books, documents, textiles," says Foley. "Freezing stops mold from growing, ink from running, and dyes from transferring. Freezing items allows you to buy some time to devote to other activities. When you are able, you can return to the frozen items and recover them on your own time."


Dispose of the Debris

Once the waters recede, residents will be able to go back into their homes and start cleaning up, and piles of ruined household belongings will be put on the curb. Cleanup can take months if not years.

Because mold creates a serious health risk, it’s important to remove wet items from your home as soon as possible. FEMA recommends not waiting for your insurance adjuster before cleaning up. Instead, document the flooding damage on your cell phone or camera. Before dragging debris to the curb, check with your municipality on how it wants you to separate items for the garbage haulers. FEMA recommends sorting items into the following six categories:

  • Bagged household garbage such as food, packaging, and paper.
  • Building materials and furniture, including drywall, carpeting, and mattresses.
  • Vegetation debris such as tree branches, plants, and leaves.
  • Hazardous household waste, including batteries, paints, and cleaning supplies.
  • Large appliances such as refrigerators, water heaters, and air conditioners.
  • Electronics such as TVs, computers, and stereo equipment.

For more information and resources, see FEMA’s After the Flood: Advice for Salvaging Damaged Family Treasures.

Article Source: https://www.consumerreports.org/cleaning/how-to-salvage-valuables-after-flooding/

Friday, January 3, 2020

What to Do After a House Fire

These four steps can help you and your family recover.


After suffering a house fire, it might be difficult to determine what to do next. These steps will help you get back on your feet.

  • Find a safe place to stay. No matter the amount of damage, you likely can't stay in your own home. If staying with friends or family isn't an option, talk to your local disaster relief agency, such as the American Red Cross or Salvation Army. These organizations will help you find a safe place to stay temporarily.
  • Contact your insurance agent. You'll need to start a claim and address your immediate needs. "Loss of use" funds from your insurance policy will cover living and other daily expenses. If you receive these funds or an advance on your claim, save all receipts and keep a detailed record of all purchases. Your insurance agent should also be able to help you secure your property and offer recommendations for cleaning up or restoring salvageable items.
  • Address your finances. You'll still need to make mortgage payments — even if your home is destroyed. Your insurance policy, which should cover your home's value and mortgage, will make payments to you and your mortgage lender. Remember: Pay the bank first and put leftover funds toward rebuilding or purchasing a new home. You'll also need to continue any car payments and replace any credit or debit cards that may have been destroyed in the house fire.
  • Recover your possessions. Items destroyed in a house fire are usually covered by insurance. Typically, the homeowner's policy is a replacement cost policy. When a loss occurs, you will receive the actual cash value of your damaged items at the time of settlement and may recover the replacement cost once the items have been replaced. To help ensure everything is accounted for, keep an inventory of your possessions. This inventory should include the date of purchase, cost at purchase and description of each item, wherever possible.

Before you find yourself dealing with a loss, it's a good idea to familiarize yourself with your insurance policy and its coverages. You can understand ahead of time what will be taken care of if a loss occurs — and what your responsibilities are.

Article Source: https://www.statefarm.com/simple-insights/residence/what-to-do-after-a-house-fire